George Colvin Land Identified On Modern Google Earth Map


George Colvin's two forty-acre parcels in Monroe County, Ohio as seen for the first time on a modern satellite image.  Calculations by A. Colvin.

George Colvin’s two forty-acre parcels in Monroe County, Ohio as seen for the first time on a modern satellite image. Calculations by A. Colvin.

For those of you who may have wondered when George Colvin, who has often been defined as the progenitor of the Ohio Colvin branch of this line,  came to Ohio and where he settled, the Colvin Study has found not only the  track book entry for what is belived to be his second  land purchase among  Marietta Land Office records but, through a combination of Google Earth and Earth Point software – a GE plug-in, the precise location of George’s land, as given in both patents, 1837 and 1843 respectively have been identified. [1] (See inset).

Finding land precisely on modern day maps using the legal description in early 19th century patents is never particularly easy because, by  2015, the original land has typically changed hands many times. In addition, while the survey system in place – in George’s case, the 7-Range System of the Ohio River Survey – gives us the grid system to work within,  that system does not show us where to find it on a modern satellite image  since those images do not provide coordinates which correspond to the 7 Ranges survey system or any survey system.  Older map do offer the layouts which show the grid and other features. An 1898 atlas, for example, offers  a detailed Jackson township map, complete with  range,  township,  and section,  and many other features  where George’s land was located, but it also shows clearly  a new owner in possession of the same land.[2]

What was needed was software which could overlay the 7-Range system, Ohio River Survey coordinates atop a satellite image of  the area in question. Luckily, the Colvin Study was able to access Earth Point software which uses Bureau of Land Management (BLM) data  to generate a grid which mimics the original Ohio River Survey which was what government officials used to sell parcels of land to folks hoping to settle within the 7-Range  lands being offered up. With this grid in place, we were then able to then use the original Patent legal descriptions to narrow down the correct southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of  Range 4,  township 2,  sections 19 and  20 respectively, where George’s two  40 -acres parcels were located. The results are seen in the first image.

Digitized original George Colvin 1829 entry, Marietta land Office, Book 1. Highlighting by researcher. Source: www.familyserch.org.

Digitized original George Colvin 1829 entry, Marietta Land Office, Book 1. Highlighting by author. Click to enlarge. Source: http://www.familyserch.org.

In addition to locating both of George’s forty-acre parcels, the date of George’s purchase of his second parcel has also been established: February 12, 1839. This is deduced from his track book entry, when he applied for his patent for that land, paying $49.00.[3] According to his patent, when he went to the federal land office at the Ohio river town of Marietta, he was apparently already settled in Monroe County. When he permanently settled is hard to pinpoint because the tract book entry for his first patent, certified in 1837,  has not yet been found in period records. However, that patent hints that George was likely staying at some earlier period in  the small river village of Bellaire in  Belmont County, itself roughly 80-98  miles from the Marietta Land  Office along the Ohio river in Ohio. He’d journeyed from Stafford County, Virginia — a distance of some 300 miles at a time when horseback was the prevailing overland mode of travel —  as evidenced by his appearance in the 1830 Stafford County, Virginia federal census.[4] After securing his land, whether he returned to Stafford where his wife, Sophia and his two children were located, or remained in Monroe County to begin the business of homesteading his land for his arriving family is unknown. This second scenario seems more likely. What is known  is that by 1835, George and Sophia and their two sons, Charles and Roseberry,  had traveled to Pennsylvania where Sophia gave birth to the couple’s first  known daughter, Eliza Jane Colvin, after which time, they likely moved on to Ohio to settle permanently on their new lands in Jackson township.

As already noted, George applied for two patents; the first one certified in 1837, and a second one, applied for in 1839 which was certified in 1843.[5]  Both forty-acre parcels  are near each other – though not conjoined. The first track book entry has not yet been located and is under query.[6] Today, the area where George’s land was originally located is hilly, densely wooded, and sparsely populated with few roads. It is located within what is today considered Wayne National Forest. In the 1930s much of this area was reforested by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps, as a federal New Deal response to deforestation by generations of farmers and timber industrialists which had stripped the hills of timber causing erosion and other issues. Unfortunately the types of trees used by CCC workers were not the same as those originally cut such as Black cherry, and White Oak. Aerial views of the region, however, make it clear the land is today very lightly inhabited with what appear to be small homesteads, some quite old. One home on a modernday parcel within the region once owned by George Colvin is over 150 years old. Between the two parcels is the Locust Grove Cemetery, a small church cemetery, in Jackson township where William Colvin, (George’s first cousin, ) along with his wife and three of their eight children are buried.[7] The earliest grave among this family group is William Colvin,  who died October 14, 1887. William, like George, was originally from Virginia, the grandson of Charles B. Colvin, himself a son of Charles Colvin, Sr.  who died in Pendleton County, Kentucky in 1810, according to extant records.

In addition to locating one of his  original entries in the track books, tax , land, and probate records are also under query which may aide in helping to establish when George died and perhaps where he is interred, which has long been a mystery. It is belived he expired between 1840 and 1850 based on his last appearance with his family in the 1840 Monroe County Census, and his absence from the same census by 1850.[8] In that census, Sophia, his wife,  appears along with their children, but as head of household enumerated as a widow. [9]

Update 7/22/15 : The digitized originals of the Jackson Township, Monroe County, Ohio Personal Property tax rolls for years 1833-1838 have been reviewed. George Colvin is not listed among them. Source: “Tax duplicates 1816-1838” (Monroe County, Ohio.) Vols. 946-951. FHL reels 545128, 514164.

Sources:

[1] In this image, the orange border represents the Township (Jackson); the  upper violet square is section 20, and the lower violet square is section 19. The inside upper colorized square  is the southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of each section, as called for in each patent.  Data accessed via http://www.earthpoint.com and the Bureau of land Management Ohio River Survey records. GPS coordinates as well as a .kmz file is available from the author at ajcolvin@uh.edu

[2] “Jackson, Texas” map, Monroe County,  Ohio, digitized original, in Caldwell’s Atlas of Monroe County, Ohio, Atlas Publishing Company, Mt. Vernon, Ohio, 1898 pp 41-42. See also, “Directory of landowners: this volume pp 46. digitized Historic Map Works,  http://www.historicmapworks.com

[3] George Colvin entry,  February 12, 1839,  digitized original, United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books,  Book 1, (1820-1902) Marietta Land Office: SW ¼ of the NE ¼  of Range 4,  TWP 2, Section 19, http://www.familysearch.org

[4] George Colvin, digitized original of 1830 U.S. Federal Census, Stafford County, Virginia. http://www.Ancestry.com

[5] George Colvin digitized original, patent certificate No. 5893,  March 9, 1843, Bureau of Land Management Patent Records database. http://www.glorecords.blm.gov

[6]   Volume 1 of Marietta Land Office Tract Book is arranged in sequential order, beginning with Range 1, and coninues in ascending order through, range, township, and section. Expecting to find George’s 1837 patent among entries in Range 4, Township 2, Section 20, it was inexplicable absent. There are two additional tract books recording entryman; however, they are arranged in no particular order.

[7] The virtual memorials of William Colvin, (1823-1887), Cazanda Bradfield Colvin (1826-1895), and three of their eight children, Roby Colvin (1851-1899), Lucinda Colvin (1853-1892) and Sophia Colvin (1865-1944) can be found at www.Find-a-Grave.com

[8] George Colvin, digitized original of 1840 U.S. Federal Census,  Jackson Twp., Monroe County, Ohio. http://www.ancestry.com

[9] Sophia Colvin digitized original of 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Monroe County, Ohio http://www.ancestry.com

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About Alex Colvin

Senior, History, minoring in Anthropology, University of Houston. Charter President, Walter Prescott Webb Historical Society, (Webb UH Main 2014-2015) University of Houston. Additional publishing credits can be found at the link:
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